Thursday, March 19, 2020

Definition and Examples of a Morph in Linguistics

Definition and Examples of a Morph in Linguistics In linguistics, a morph is a word segment that represents one morpheme (the smallest unit of language that has meaning) in sound or writing. Its a written or pronounced portion of a word, such as an affix (a prefix or suffix). For example, the word infamous is made up of three morphs- in-, fam(e), -eous- each of which represents one morpheme. The word has two affixes, both a prefix (in-) and a suffix (-eous) attached to a root word. Key Takeaways: Morphs Morphs are portions of a word, such as affixes.Morphs that are also whole words are called free morphs.The different sounds that pronounce a morph are its allomorphs.A morpheme is a description, such as a past-tense verb ending. This morpheme is often represented by the morph -ed. Morphs, Morphemes, and Allomorphs Although a morpheme is an abstract unit of meaning, a morph is a formal unit with a physical shape. A morpheme is the description of what a morph is or does to a word. Author George David Morley explains: For example, the morpheme meaning negative forming is evidenced in adjectives by the morphs un as in unclear, in - inadequate, im - immoral, il - illegal, ig - ignoble, ir - irregular, non - non-existent, dis - dishonest.  (Syntax in Functional Grammar: An Introduction to Lexicogrammar in Systemic  Linguistics.  Continuum, 2000) When something has multiple ways that a sound can be created, these are its allomorphs. Authors Mark Aronoff and Kirsten Fudeman explain the concept this way:  For example, the English past tense morpheme that we spell -ed has various [allomorphs or variants]. It is realized as [t] after the voiceless [p] of jump (cf. jumped), as [d] after the voiced [l] of repel (cf. repelled), and as [É™d] after the voiceless [t] of root or the voiced [d] of wed (cf. rooted and wedded). (What Is Morphology?  2nd ed. Wiley-Blackwell, 2011) Types of Morphs A morph that can stand alone as a word is called a free morph. For example, the adjective big, the verb walk, and the noun home are free morphs. Root words may or may not be free morphs. For example, the root in the word construction is struct, meaning to build. The word also contains the prefix con- and -ion (the latter of which shows that the word is a noun). A morph that cant stand alone as a word is called a bound morph;  the endings -er (as in bigger), -ed (as in walked), and -s (as in homes) are bound morphs (or affixes). When Is a Word Part a Morph? For most language users, being able to pare a word down into its parts (root words and affixes) is sufficient for the purposes of understanding a complex word. Take the word antidisestablishment. It can be broken into the following: anti- (against), dis- (taking apart), establish (root word; to disestablish is to end an official status, especially of a church), and -ment  (showing the word is a noun). Surmised from the sum of its parts, then, the word means being against the state breaking up a church, and it particularly refers to the 19th-century Church of England. Conversely, for most users, knowledge of affixes will suffice to create words from parts. This is what George W. Bush was going for when he said that people misunderestimate him. Native speakers of English who know what the prefix mis- means understands what the former president was trying to say, even though he created a new word for the popular lexicon (a Bushism) when he misspoke. (Bushism is also an example of a created word, containing Bush, referring to the former president, and -ism, a noun, meaning characteristic of the word its attached to.) Instead of stopping at the root word and affix level, some linguists take the word dissection even farther, as author Keith Denning and colleagues describe: Etymologists and those interested in the history of the language may go in the opposite direction and isolate as a morph every sound that ever had a distinct function, even if they have to go as far back as Proto-Indo-European to find it. Both viewpoints are valid, as long as the criteria are clearly stated. (Keith Denning, Brett Kessler, and William R. Leben,  English Vocabulary Elements, 2nd ed. Oxford University Press, 2007.)

Monday, March 2, 2020

Members of Congress by Profession

Members of Congress by Profession There are lots of professional politicians, those solons who hop from one elective office to another and always land on their feet - or at the helm of some federal agency or even in the Senate - because theres no such thing as statutory term limits  and theres no way to recall them. But many members of Congress came from real professions before being elected.  There have been actors, comedians, talk-show hosts, famous journalists and all sorts of doctors who have served in the House of Representatives and U.S. Senate.   Members of Congress By  Profession So who are these people and what did they do? There are the obvious non-politicians: actor and President Ronald Reagan,  Songwriter Sonny Bono was one-half of Sonny and Cher,  one of the most popular rock duos  of the 1960s and early 1970s,  author and  talk-show host  Al Franken, who  was  best known for his role on  Saturday Night Live.  Who can forget professional wrestler Jesse The Body Ventura, whose political resume ended at governor of Minnesota? But what about the common members of Congress? Where did they come from? What were their professions? Business and Law Data compiled regularly by the Washington, D.C., publication Roll Call and the Congressional Research Service have found that the most common professions held by burgeoning members of the House and Senate are in law, business and education. In the 113th Congress, for example, nearly a fifth of the 435 House members and 100 senators worked in education, either as teachers, professors, school counselors, administrators or coaches, according to the Roll Call and Congressional Research data. There were twice as many lawyers and businessmen and businesswomen. Professional Politicians The most common profession among members of Congress, though, is that of a public servant. Thats a nice-sounded term for a career politician. More than half of our U.S. senators served in the House, for example. But there are dozens of former small-town mayors, state governors, former judges, ex-state lawmakers, one-time congressional staffers, sheriffs and FBI agents, just to name a few. More Unusual Professions Of course, not everyone in Congress is a lawyer or professional politician or celebrity seeking to make a serious name for himself or herself. Some of the other jobs held by members of Congress include the following: Car dealerRodeo AnnouncerWelderFuneral home ownerSoftware engineerPhysicianDentists  Veterinarians  PsychiatristPsychologistsOptometristNurse  MinisterPhysicistEngineerMicrobiologist  Radio talk show host  JournalistAccountantPilotAstronautProfessional football playerFilmmaker  FarmerAlmond orchard ownerVintner  FishermanSocial workerStockbroker Are You Thinking of Running for Office? Before you launch that presidential campaign, there are some things you ought to know. These dentists and stockbrokers and astronauts didnt just jump headfirst into politics. Most were involved, whether it was through volunteering with campaigns, becoming members of the local party committees, giving money to super PACs or other political action committees and serving in small, unpaid municipal positions.

Saturday, February 15, 2020

Negotiation Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1750 words

Negotiation - Essay Example Frank Hu, the partner was located in CA at the time. He is a 40-year-old IT engineer with a great background of people resources in the area. His role was to act as a bridge between the CA clients and us, located in TX. In the deal, Frank’s primary job was to organize Seminars. This covered arrangement of location, advertising and general contacts. With this limited responsibility, Frank was happy with 20% share on each closed house deal based on 3% commission of sales price, plus 50% share cost on all business expenses for Advertising and Seminars. My team leader – Lady M, chose me to play her primary role, and gave me the charge of the investing department and the authority to deal with Frank. I was quick learner, and was able to lead the negotiations with confidence in a matter of two months. My primary duties were Seminar hosting, Real Estate tour trips, sales and buying, house leasing, and also rental management between investors and tenants. It was a 24/7 job and I was able to learn a lot and survived though unlimited multi-tasking. My own share percentage with Lady M was 1/3 of sales price in each closed transaction plus 50% of any bonuses from new home builders on top of deals. It sounded great in compare with my work. Monthly volume at the time was a minimum of 6 seminars in CA, with average of 10 or more closures. Besides we got 10 -15 rental houses on the market, and the cumulative number of housing management started from 50 from when I joined the business. It was exhausting work but the compensation was worth the effort. Indeed I thought my life could not be more perfect and tougher, until the unexpected happened. One day in winter, Frank and his wife secretly flied into Dallas for a private meeting with me. On the dinner table at my home, Frank started off with remarks that Lady M, who had not been neither involved nor devoted to any efforts all this time, skimmed off

Sunday, February 2, 2020

Economic Crisis And Opportunity For Entrepreneurship Research Proposal

Economic Crisis And Opportunity For Entrepreneurship - Research Proposal Example An innovative entrepreneur is expected to possess high-risk appetite when starting a venture with the clear understanding of the correlation between risk & uncertainty which can be calculated by applying known probabilities and impacts. Knowing the industry dynamics, the entrepreneurs are expected to take calculated risks into account to bear the uncertainty of production & trade. The payoff is the profit earned by the entrepreneur which is the primary motive. In this context, the venture capitalist plays the role of trusting the innovation & risk appetite of an entrepreneur and providing funds for transitioning the ideas into action thus helping in the formation of good performing start-ups. A nation having the effective framework of capitalists (Banks, Financial Institutions, Private lenders, etc.) ensures better development of entrepreneurship thus boosting the economic growth. ...Entrepreneurs generate new ideas by virtue of innovations which may comprise of: (a) Introduction of a new product in the market (b) Introduction of a new technology in the market (c) Introduction of a new methodology of production in the industry (d) Opening a new business potential & market in the region which has remained untouched largely by other companies (e) Discovery of a new source of supply of raw materials, support & services which is not known to other companies (f) Building a new organization system with the innovative business model not tested by other organizations (g) Overall, create new profit opportunities An innovative entrepreneur is expected to possess high-risk appetite when starting a venture with the clear understanding of the correlation between risk & uncertainty which can be calculated by applying known probabilities and impacts. Knowing the industry dynamics, the entrepreneurs are expected to take calculated risks into account to bear the uncertainty of production & trade.

Saturday, January 25, 2020

The role of Animals in The Unbearable Lightness of Being and Poems New

Since animals, usually pets, are sometimes an essential part of one’s life, it is not surprising that we find frequent references to its role in works of social realism, such as Wislawa Szymborska’s Poems New and Collected and Milan Kundera’s Unbearable Lightness of Being. Animals in literature could be used to symbolize all sorts of things, but in particular, animals may represent the personality of a character. This is because as humans and animals co-exist in the same atmosphere, certain aspects of a character reveal themselves in the compassion or even hatred towards the animal. Since animals are often known to trigger the interests of humans, the attitude of the humans towards the animals contributes much to character revelation. Both Szymborska and Kundera use animals to symbolize character personality in their works. Therefore, through looking at animals, although it does seem to be a very commonplace topic, we may gain insight to what the writers are try ing to convey about the character. This paper will compare the ways the writers use animals to determine a character’s personality or characteristics. A recurring character in Kundera’s Unbearable Lightness of being is Karenin, a dog saved from death by one of the novel’s protagonists, Tomas. He had wanted some sort of a distraction that would keep Tereza’s attention off him so that he could persist with his life that he believed he had control over: At last he made his choice: a bitch whose body seemed reminiscent of the German shepherd and whose head belonged to its Saint Bernard mother. He took it home to Tereza, who picked it up and pressed it to her breast. ¹ Through the novel, Karenin, the ‘ugly dog’ Tomas brings home for Tereza, develops a bond between Tereza, which grows throughout the novel. Tereza is portrayed as a ‘heavy’ individual with considerably heavy burdens on both her shoulders. One other burden Tereza carries is, essentially, Karenin. It takes the place of Tomas when Tereza is alone, therefore – Tereza is bound, with love, to it. Kundera shows here, how Karenin affects Tereza’s personality by being next to her and being a comfort to her at times when heaviness settles in.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Furthermore, with no baby between Tereza and Tomas’ marriage, Karenin acts as Tereza’s responsibility, both emotionally and financially. It seems that Tereza can make decisions only... ...tion by executing government opposition – an example how humanity acted in ‘other’ moral situations. The last chapter, ’Karenin’s Smile’, is counting up to Karenin’s death, while ‘between the lines’, Tereza and Tomas dies. Their death is outweighed by their dog’s death and its funeral. This shows how humanity seems to be condemned by their moral actions towards animals, the ‘test’ mentioned above.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  The way that the role of animals can be used as a literary effect is evident in both Kundera and Szymborska’s works. The two contrast eachother, Kundera suggests that the role of animals in his novel is that they become their owner’s peaceful character builder by having characters of their own. In Szymborska’s works, we see quite the opposite; she portrays the role of animals as people’s irritation, a vexation – where characters are rather barbaric and careless towards the animals. The two works show the same superiority of human over animals, yet the human attitudes towards them entirely dissimilar. We may perceive that the presence of animals, such delicate literary technique, determines the attitudes and personality of the characters of a literary work. The role of Animals in The Unbearable Lightness of Being and Poems New Since animals, usually pets, are sometimes an essential part of one’s life, it is not surprising that we find frequent references to its role in works of social realism, such as Wislawa Szymborska’s Poems New and Collected and Milan Kundera’s Unbearable Lightness of Being. Animals in literature could be used to symbolize all sorts of things, but in particular, animals may represent the personality of a character. This is because as humans and animals co-exist in the same atmosphere, certain aspects of a character reveal themselves in the compassion or even hatred towards the animal. Since animals are often known to trigger the interests of humans, the attitude of the humans towards the animals contributes much to character revelation. Both Szymborska and Kundera use animals to symbolize character personality in their works. Therefore, through looking at animals, although it does seem to be a very commonplace topic, we may gain insight to what the writers are try ing to convey about the character. This paper will compare the ways the writers use animals to determine a character’s personality or characteristics. A recurring character in Kundera’s Unbearable Lightness of being is Karenin, a dog saved from death by one of the novel’s protagonists, Tomas. He had wanted some sort of a distraction that would keep Tereza’s attention off him so that he could persist with his life that he believed he had control over: At last he made his choice: a bitch whose body seemed reminiscent of the German shepherd and whose head belonged to its Saint Bernard mother. He took it home to Tereza, who picked it up and pressed it to her breast. ¹ Through the novel, Karenin, the ‘ugly dog’ Tomas brings home for Tereza, develops a bond between Tereza, which grows throughout the novel. Tereza is portrayed as a ‘heavy’ individual with considerably heavy burdens on both her shoulders. One other burden Tereza carries is, essentially, Karenin. It takes the place of Tomas when Tereza is alone, therefore – Tereza is bound, with love, to it. Kundera shows here, how Karenin affects Tereza’s personality by being next to her and being a comfort to her at times when heaviness settles in.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Furthermore, with no baby between Tereza and Tomas’ marriage, Karenin acts as Tereza’s responsibility, both emotionally and financially. It seems that Tereza can make decisions only... ...tion by executing government opposition – an example how humanity acted in ‘other’ moral situations. The last chapter, ’Karenin’s Smile’, is counting up to Karenin’s death, while ‘between the lines’, Tereza and Tomas dies. Their death is outweighed by their dog’s death and its funeral. This shows how humanity seems to be condemned by their moral actions towards animals, the ‘test’ mentioned above.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  The way that the role of animals can be used as a literary effect is evident in both Kundera and Szymborska’s works. The two contrast eachother, Kundera suggests that the role of animals in his novel is that they become their owner’s peaceful character builder by having characters of their own. In Szymborska’s works, we see quite the opposite; she portrays the role of animals as people’s irritation, a vexation – where characters are rather barbaric and careless towards the animals. The two works show the same superiority of human over animals, yet the human attitudes towards them entirely dissimilar. We may perceive that the presence of animals, such delicate literary technique, determines the attitudes and personality of the characters of a literary work.

Friday, January 17, 2020

Better to Die for Your Beliefs or Lie to Save Your Life Essay

I believe that it is better to die for what you believe rather than to lie to save your own life. Many people have died for their beliefs. There are martyrs from all over the world, and they were not afraid to stand up for what they believed in, even if it meant losing their lives. Those people have gone down in history, and are respected by many. Joan of Arc was burned at the stake at the age of 19 for believing that her visions were from God. The English leaders tried to force her to deny that God had spoken to her, but she refused. She went down in history as a great martyr and she is still today and perfect example of standing up for what you believe in. Another great martyr was St. Stephen, who was accused of blasphemy against Moses and God. St. Stephen was stoned to death by an angry mob, and he claimed to have seen God the Father and God the Son right before he died. He was considered the first Christian martyr. As well as there has been martyrs in the world, there has also been people that lied to save their life. In the Bible, Peter was recognized as one of Jesus’ followers, and was questioned in the public. As the crowd became more suspicious, Peter denied Jesus three times. He was too worried about his own life that he took the easy way out. After he denied him, he realized what he had done and the guilt almost destroyed him. Later in his life he returned and admitted to their accusations, and was crucified upside-down. In the story The Crucible, many teenage girls are accused of witchcraft, which in Puritan society the punishment is death. To save their own lives, they take the spotlight off themselves and begin to blame other women in their society for their own selfish gain. They were cowards and lived in lies, making innocent people suffer. All over the world there are people being persecuted for their own personal beliefs. The people â€Å"in charge† decide what they want everyone else to believe, and they enforce it with harsh punishments or even death. Martyrdom is not necessarily dying for spiritual beliefs; it is dying for anything you believe in. People everywhere are mistreated because of their religious beliefs, their political preference, or the color of their skin. Over time there have been leaders who have tried to make their â€Å"perfect race,† but what would this world be without diversity? No one should be able to decide what is the correct belief or the right way to live life. Everyone is different. But unfortunately there are leaders and people who believe they have the right to decide these things, so it is very important to have a good understand of what your personal beliefs are. It is very important to be willing to stand up for what you personally believe in, even if it may cost you something as great as your own life.

Wednesday, January 8, 2020

A Modest Proposal For Preventing The Children Of Poor People

Satire is a method used by multitudes of authors and other artists for a plethora of different reasons. The ways that this method of literature is used is varied, and it is always interesting and somewhat difficult to find out exactly why these texts are written. A specific author who is known for utilizing satire in his works of literature is Jonathan Swift, whose hard-hitting essay â€Å"A Modest Proposal For Preventing the Children of Poor People in Ireland, from Being a Burden on Their Parents or Country, and for Making Them Beneficial to the Publick† is one of the most popular and analyzed texts within the world of satire, and truly makes one think about the art. One article that explores Swift’s use of satire within â€Å"A Modest Proposal† is Paddy Bullord’s â€Å"The Scriblerian Mock-Arts† This essay delves deeply into Swift’s works, and the art of satire in itself and is a great way to explore Swift’s work. The main question a bout Swift’s â€Å"A Modest Proposal† that will be explained and explored through this paper is this; what prompts Swift to write about his points using irony and satire, even though satire is a method that metaphorically goes over the head of its readers? Swift’s view on satire can be seen through Paddy Bullord’s article, where he explains how Swift felt about the art. Bullord states that many satirists refer to satire as something potentially effective, but ultimately something that can easily backfire on the author. As Bullord says, Jonathan Swift did not holdShow MoreRelatedEssay on A Modest Proposal: Satire at Its Best643 Words   |  3 PagesA Modest Proposal: Satire at Its Best Jonathan Swifts 1729 essay, A Modest Proposal, was a true example of satire at its best. Many readers at the time rejected the essay because they failed to understand the irony. It is presently one of the most well known works of satire and is a classic example of the technique most commonly used today. The entire essay from the title down to the last sentence were meant to be taken ironically, which is a rare form, but very effective when trying gettingRead MoreAnalyzing Jonathan Swifts A Modest Proposal: A Satirical Surprise Ending812 Words   |  3 PagesJonathan Swifts A Modest Proposal can be said to have a satirical surprise ending, even though the reader is well prepared for it based on the tone and style of Swifts writing and any prior knowledge of the authors intentions. Swifts final solution to the problem of overpopulation is for the poor to sell their children as food for the rich. 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